Dedication

This website is devoutly dedicated to all of Larry's friends and associates, both early and late, who have influenced and mentored him. However, it also should be noted that, being who they are, a majority of them have been late most of the time.

Monday, July 6, 2020

"Of Mice & Men" (and also Women)

The "Mouseland" fable originally was written in the 1940's by Clarence Gillis, and then later narrated by the late Tommy Douglas and subsequently made into a slide show presentation.

It was in the late 1960's when I first saw a film of the slide show version, when I was a political science undergraduate student at Frostburg State College in Western Maryland.

It since then has been remade into an animated video version.

Regardless of the politics and Canadian nationality of Tommy Douglas, Mouseland's message rises above fractious and feckless political partisanship, both then and now, with a cry for each and every one of us to stand up and be responsible for our own personal accountability and empowerment.

Click here to watch the video, and decide for yourself if these principles make as much sense to you as they do for me.

Also, pass this along to all of your friends, family, and associates by clicking on the envelope icon at the end of this entry. Even better: Ask them all to go and do likewise!

Regardless of where you live, do your part to support the quest for "Jobs & Prosperity", "Personal Liberty & Family Values", and "Returning Government Back to the People".


Until then, may God bless you all real good!

Working together to Stay Independent,

Larry D. Kump


Postscript: Visit the other posts on this website and also www.facebook.com/LarryDKump for more of this about that!

Addendum: Send your contributions for my election to:

Friends of Larry D. Kump
P. O. Box 1131
Falling Waters, West Virginia 25419-1131

Saturday, July 4, 2020

Why It Matters

 Especially now and in these troubled times, some even are questioning our  Constitution , which is our God given well-spring of our "American Excellence".
 That's why it is so important for each and every one of us to stand up and speak out on behalf of our sacred principles of self determination, liberty, and personal accountability.

Click on the link below for more of this about that:







-West Virginia Delegate Larry D. Kump, District #59 (Berkeley-Morgan counties)

Postscript:
 Also visit my other Facebook posts, as well as www.LarryKump.us, for my views on other issues.
 And, for sure and for certain, may God bless you all real good!

Saturday, June 13, 2020

Kump Biography

Larry D. Kump came out of retirement and was first elected to the West Virginia House of Delegates in 2010, serving two terms in office (until the end of 2014). He then once again came out of retirement and was elected for yet another two year term in the West Virginia House of Delegates in 2018-2020 (Republican, District #59, Berkeley-Morgan counties).

He also has over forty years of prior legislative and public administration skills and experience.

These skills and experience includes management expertise in managing large budgets and meeting payrolls. This expertise is on both the management and employees' side of the table in multiple jurisdictions throughout our nation. He also has drafted and gotten legislation passed into law, often against formidable opposition.

Larry is no stranger to hard work. He began work at age twelve (managing two newspaper routes at the same time), worked at a local shoe store at age 16 (every day after school and on Saturdays), and then continued working at a number of full and part-time jobs to pay for his college tuition. He even found time to be a local radio personality.

This grateful husband of his beloved and bodacious wife Cheryl and proud father of David & Sarah graduated from Frostburg State University with a Political & Social Science Majors and Minors in Economics, Geography, & Philosophy. Since then he has received an alumni achievement award. He later also returned to Hagerstown Community College to receive an Associate's degree, which included a concentration  in Criminal Justice & Business Administration. The community college has given him a community citation award.

He worked in bank management, trained as a CPA, was the Legislative Aide for the Pennsylvania Senate Republican Leader, and even was accepted as a candidate for MENSA membership.

This grass roots leader and Constitutional scholar then went on to be a Labor Relations Specialist for the Maryland Classified Employees Association (MCEA), an independent public employee advocate organization.

After working for MCEA, Larry accepted the position as the Executive Director of the Indiana State Employees Association (ISEA), another independent public employee advocate group. He reorganized ISEA's structure and budget, frequently lecturing at Indiana University and Purdue University post graduate classes on public administration practices and principles.

This kinsman to founding father Patrick Henry and former West Virginia Governor Herman Guy Kump (1932 term) also is related to Town of Hedgesville founder Josiah Hedges.

He also previously served as Regional President of the Assembly of Governmental Employees (AGE), overseeing public policy advocacy issues from Illinois to West Virginia, and received various additional awards for his public service.

His other activities included serving as a leader of the Foundation for Advancement for Industrial research (FAIR), the American Society for Public Administration (ASPA), and many other public service organization, as well as serving as an arbitrator for the Better Business Bureau and the American Arbitration Association.

Moving to West Virginia in 1989, he graduated at the top of his class from the Maryland Correctional Professional Staff Academy as a Maryland Prison Case Manager and then  continued to serve as a court expert witness, employee training coordinator, cognitive development trainer, employee critical incident stress counselor, and certified mediator.

He also worked part-time during the evenings as a sex offender group therapy facilitator.

Serving in numerous MCEA elected offices, Larry drafted legislative proposals for the Maryland Legislature and testified before various Legislative Committees.

In 1991, he also successfully organized a coalition of Berkeley County neighbors to block plans for sewage effluent discharge across their privately owned properties by an out-of-state developer.

After witnessing the overwhelmed facilities and woefully inadequate parking at the local Falling Waters Post Office, he contacted and persuaded the national postal authorities to build a new Post Office in 1993.

A cancer survivor, this independent thinker and advocate of citizen empowerment also is an ordained minister within the Hedgesville Ward (congregation) of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church).

Larry is a strong believer in rock solid fiscal discipline, enhancing family values, and strengthening individual liberty and personal responsibilities.

Gravely concerned about those who are elected to represent us, Larry continually reminds friends and associates that our government belongs solely to the citizens, and that too many forget that one of the major sources of our "American Excellence simply is our Constitution and our citizens.

Please visit the other posts on this website and also www.LarryKump.com for more about his views on the issues.

Meanwhile and for sure and for certain, may God bless you all real good!

Friday, June 12, 2020

Martin Niemoller & Us

Offering the invocation at a West Virginia Legislative Session


The ongoing firearms phobia and also the current obsession with hateful and divisive "Identity Politics" by much of our national mainstream media and even some of our elected representatives continues to alarm and worry me.

These perverse perspectives of social justice endanger all of our collective and individual liberties.

Many of these folks seem confusedly convinced that undermining our "American Excellence", by trampling upon our sacred Constitutional rights, somehow will eliminate the dreadful depredations of those who are morally corrupt, malevolent, or even mentally ill.

And so it went that I continued to pray and ponder about this instant assault upon all of our citizen rights and liberties, especially those provided by those amendments that comprise our Constitution's "Bill of Rights".

Then, I remembered my days long ago, as the student editor of "The Night Crier" campus newspaper at Hagerstown Junior College, and how I was inspired by a wall poster about Martin Niemoller.

Martin knew first hand why it's so important for each and every one of us to stand up and be counted in our collective pursuit of liberty and individual rights for each and every one of us, regardless of our differences.

He was a German and a Protestant pastor, who spent the last seven years of World War II as a prisoner in various Nazi concentration camps.

Martin spoke contemporaneously, and different versions abound about what he said, but it went something like this:

"First, they came for the Socialists, and I did not speak out -- Because I was not a Socialist.

Then, they came for the Trade Unionists, and I did not speak out -- Because I was not a Trade Unionist.

Then, they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out -- Because I was not a Jew.

Then, they came for the Catholics, and I did not speak out -- Because I was not a Catholic.

Then, they came for me -- and there was no one left to speak for me."


For more of this about other good governance issues, see my other posts at this site, and also visit www.facebook.com/LarryDKump.

Please share this message with others,and ask them to go and do likewise with even more others!


And, for sure and for certain, may God bless you all real good!

West Virginia Delegate Larry D. Kump
District #59 (Berkeley-Morgan counties)

Postscript: My maternal Grandfather's family were German Jews.

Thursday, June 11, 2020

Faith & Politics: My Personal Pilgrimage

Alexis de Tocqueville, French author (1805-1859), once pointed out, "America is great because she is good. If America ceases to be good, America will cease to be great".
 So, as we and our nation now continues to struggle and we begin to look forward, in the 2020 elections, this previous and now updated post of mine struck me as even more relevant now than when I originally posted it, years ago.
   Although first elected in 2010 as a Republican in the mostly Democrat West Virginia House of Delegates, my political affiliation was and is not the only driving force empowering my views about governance.
 Indeed, I agree with our nation's founding father, George Washington, who disparaged the fractious and feckless political partisanship, that so sadly and continues to distract and divert us from good governance.
 And so it was that, when I initially and somewhat reluctantly ran for election in 2010, I considered myself mostly as an independent and liberty minded "Constitutional", and even somewhat "Populist" candidate.
 I continue to strive to act upon and follow those guiding principles, and always have striven to choose principles over politics.
 I stoutly believe that our United States Constitution and "Bill of Rights" is a sacred and dynamic document that succors liberty and individual accountability, as well as fosters our nation's economic prosperity.
 My faith in Christ reinforces my belief that our United States Constitution was drafted "...by the hands of wise men whom (God) raised up into this very purpose, and redeemed the land by the shedding of blood." (The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Doctrine & Covenants, Section 101, Verse 80)
 I also believe that our Constitutional rights should and must be preserved, "That every man may act in doctrine and principle pertaining to futurity, according to the moral agency which (God has) given unto him, that every man may be accountable...". (The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Doctrine & Covenants, Section 101, Verse 78)
 My faith's mantra of individual accountability and "agency" (freedom of choice) parallels my political philosophy of individual liberty and  personal accountability, as well as economic freedom.
 Also, as a follower of Christ, I believe and continue to strive to practice the principle of charity (the pure love of Christ) toward others and tolerance toward them and their various lifestyles.
 However, it is, to me, a perversion of these principles, when we attempt to force our fellow citizens and rob them of their personal accountability and freedom by government fiat.
 Divisive "Identity Politics" further compounds this tragedy, by eroding these principles even more. My heart truly does bleed for the less fortunate, but it is a puzzlement to me when others use their sympathy for the less fortunate to justify expanding initiative destroying government entitlement programs and creating even more of them (more of both the programs and the less fortunate).
 In my view, these expanding government dependency programs and policies weaken the foundation of all of us and our families.
 These expanding government programs create a sense of expectation that the government somehow is responsible for our welfare and happiness. In doing so, the strength of our families and the health of our nation increasingly crumbles, to the peril of all of us and our loved ones.  
 Indeed, former social worker and United States Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan (D-New York) previously warned us that our rush to increase government control over our lives would lead to the breakdown of our families and an increasingly large and permanent caste system of the underprivileged. His prediction was prophetic, and we now have third and fourth generations of people becoming prey to government entitlements. Increasingly, they now mistakenly look to the government for their well-being and even their happiness.
 Nowhere has this been more dramatically demonstrated to me than when I previously worked as a prison case manager, dealing with inmates, many of whom had come to expect and even demand "lock-up welfare".
 Our prisons are overflowing, our freedoms are eroding, our law enforcement weakening, and our taxes are increasing - all because we are prostituting our sacred birthrights to the government for "pottage". (Bible, Old Testament, Genesis, Chapter 25, Verses 29-34)
 Moreover, my personal view of good governance is that God "holds man accountable for their acts in relation to them, both in making laws and administering them, for the good and safety of society", and that "...no government can exist in peace, except such laws are framed and held inviolate as will secure to each individual the free exercise of conscience, the right and control of property, and the protection of life." (The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Doctrine & Covenants. Section 134, Verses 1-2)
 Further, "...all men are justified in defending themselves, their friends, and property...from the unlawful assaults and encroachments of all persons in times of exigency...". (The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Doctrine & Covenants, Section 134, Verse 11. See also the 2nd Amendment to the United States Constitution)
 In essence, my faith mirrors that of a Pre-Columbian American prophet, who proclaimed, "My soul standeth fast in that liberty in the which God has made us free." (Book of Mormon, Alma, Chapter 61, Verse 9)
 Although not born or raised in the my faith, I now cannot discern much, if any, difference between my faith and my political views. The origin of my current viewpoint on government is somewhat akin to the old riddle about which came first (the chicken or the egg)?
 It now is all the same to me.
  And so it goes.
 Meanwhile, may we all prayerfully work together, earnestly seeking the blessings of Providence and inspired governance, for ourselves and our families' prosperity.
 Please share this post with others, asking them to go and do likewise, and may God bless you all real good!
-West Virginia Delegate Larry D. Kump, District #59 (Berkeley-Morgan counties)

Visit  my other posts on www.LarryKump.com and www.LarryKump.us. for more about my views on good governance.

How this Citizen Legislator Serves

Recent legislative differences of opinions and even some  recent calumnious eruptions within the halls of our West Virginia State Legislature have prompted me to publish how and why I both continue to sacrifice and serve in the West Virginia House Of Delegates (District # 59, Berkeley-Morgan counties)

 Previously and currently, when serving in the West Virginia Legislature (2010-2014 and 2018 to present)), it always has been my habit to arrive early for all committee hearings, and also to start each of my legislative work days at the State House prior to 6:00 AM, and usually earlier than even then.

(It's amazing what you can accomplish with advance preparation and a robust work ethic!)

 Also, I never have participated in lobbyists' dinners or parties during legislative sessions.

 Even so, my legislative office door always has been open to anyone who wants to discuss issues and principles with me.

Furthermore, rather than relying on the loudest and most raucous voices of some constituents and a few lobbyists, my simple solution always has been to carefully consider the merits of all constituent concerns, but then also be diligent in upholding the sacred Constitutional Oath of Office, which is given to all elected officials.

Our Oath of Office is to prayerfully deliberate, uphold, and defend  our state and federal Constitutions. This sacred vow is not only made to us and our constituents, but also to God.

Truly, doesn't our Constitution  mandate that the basict principles and practices of our government are the pursuit of individual liberty, personal accountability, and personal empowerment (i. e., the "Pursuit of Happiness")?

And so, that always has been and is the well-spring of our unique "American Excellence", and also it is my duty and goal as a West Virginia state legislator.

Simply put, it's not about striving  to pander to the loudest  and most raucous voices.

Instead, it  always should be to attempt to strive to glean the best legislative vote, regardless of any future election outcome.

That is my greatest desire, and may that principle and practice of mine never waiver.

Please Visit www.facebook.com/LarryDKump and www.LarryKump.us, for more about other principles and issues of good governance. For an even better view of the principles of good governance, read the "Davy Crockett & the Sockdolager" entry at www.LarryKump.us. It's a long read, but I believe that the governing principles that it proclaims is well worth your time and interest.
Share this post with others, and ask them to go and do likewise with still others.😉
May God bless you all real good!😍

Wednesday, June 10, 2020

Looking Forward...

Reflecting on the recent West Virginia Primary election and our ongoing blessings:
Throughout my entire life, even during multiple periods of trials and tribulations, God has reached out His hand to me and repeatedly lifted me up.🤗
And so it also is now, for both me and my beloved and bodacious wife Cheryl. 🤔
Further and most especially now, both Cheryl and I stand in grateful amazement for the supernal support recently given to us from so many of our friends and supporters.😮
Truly, this has been and continues to be a "marvelous work and a wonder" for Cheryl and me (King James Bible, Old Testament, Isaiah, Chapter 29, Verse 14). 🙏
For sure and for certain, may God bless you all real good! 😍
www.LarryKump.us

Tuesday, June 9, 2020

Bodacious Bob (the Wonder Dog) & Me

My beautiful and beloved wife Cheryl took this photo, of me and Bodacious Bob (the Wonder Dog), watching the returns during the West Virginia Primary election night.
 Of course, Bob wanted to vote for me.

Montani Semper Liberi & More!

Here are just a few fascinating facts about West Virginia:

*Montani Semper Liberi!” (“Mountaineers are Always Free!”) is our official State Motto. Oft times, our elected officials struggle to understand and preserve this precious liberty. Also, my friend Tom Price, while lamenting the efforts of our West Virginia elected officials to impose even more taxes upon us, recently exclaimed, "Montani Semper Impensa!" (Mountaineers Always Pay the Fee!)

*“Vandalia” was the first name suggested for West Virginia, as part of a proposed 14th colony, which also included Eastern Kentucky and Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. The first name proposed for the current State of West Virginia was “Kanawha”, although that proposal did not include the current Eastern Panhandle as part of West Virginia.

*The West Virginia “State Fruit” is not our elected public officials. It is the Golden Delicious Apple.

*Romney (Hampshire County) and Shepherdstown (Jefferson County) fiercely contest which was the first incorporated municipality in West Virgina, but Hedgesville (Berkeley County) was soon thereafter.

*Civil War General Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson was born in West Virginia.

*The Grandparents of famous frontiersman and hero of the Alamo, Davy Crockett, lived in Spring Mills (Berkeley County). Their home still stands, just a few scant miles from my home in Falling Waters.

*“Pepperoni Rolls” were created by West Virginia coal miners, as a handy meal to take with them into the depths of coal mines. West Virginia Delegate Joshua Nelson authored a resolution naming pepperoni rolls as the official West Virginia State Food in the 2013 session of the West Virginia Legislature.

*One of the smallest parks in the Untied States is “Berkeley Springs State Park”, which is right smack downtown in the West Virginia town of “Bath”. Nope, the name of the town of Bath is not Berkeley Springs. Berkeley Springs only is the name of the Post Office which serves the town of Bath.

Also, visit www.facebook.com/LarryDKump for information about good governance issues

Please share this message with others, asking them to also go and do likewise!

And may God bless you all real good!

Monday, June 8, 2020

Davy Crockett & the Sockdolager

Reposted as requested:

When I just was a young sprat, the Walt Disney television show about the life of Davy Crockett, the hero of the Alamo, was the favorite of me and my pals. We all even persistently pestered our parents until they allowed all of us to get and proudly wear coonskin hats. Much later in my life, I gleefully discovered that Davy's grandparents once lived only a scant few miles from my Falling Waters home in Spring Mills (Berkeley County, West Virginia), where it still stands today. Back in 2013, I shared the following "Sockdolager" incident from Davy's life with all my fellow West Virginia State Legislators. It speaks for itself.
 - West Virgina Delegate Larry D. Kump



Davy Crockett & the "Sockdolager"

From The Life of Colonel David Crockett,
by Edward S. Ellis (Philadelphia: Porter & Coates, 1884)

Crockett was then the lion of Washington. I was a great admirer of his character, and, having several friends who were intimate with him, I found no difficulty in making his acquaintance. I was fascinated with him, and he seemed to take a fancy to me.

I was one day in the lobby of the House of Representatives when a bill was taken up appropriating money for the benefit of a widow of a distinguished naval officer. Several beautiful speeches had been made in its support – rather, as I thought, because it afforded the speakers a fine opportunity for display than from the necessity of convincing anybody, for it seemed to me that everybody favored it. The Speaker was just about to put the question when Crockett arose. Everybody expected, of course, that he was going to make one of his characteristic speeches in support of the bill. He commenced:

"Mr. Speaker – I have as much respect for the memory of the deceased, and as much sympathy for the sufferings of the living, if suffering there be, as any man in this House, but we must not permit our respect for the dead or our sympathy for a part of the living to lead us into an act of injustice to the balance of the living. I will not go into an argument to prove that Congress has no power to appropriate this money as an act of charity. Every member upon this floor knows it. We have the right, as individuals, to give away as much of our own money as we please in charity; but as members of Congress we have no right so to appropriate a dollar of the public money. Some eloquent appeals have been made to us upon the ground that it is a debt due the deceased. Mr. Speaker, the deceased lived long after the close of the war; he was in office to the day of his death, and I have never heard that the government was in arrears to him. This government can owe no debts but for services rendered, and at a stipulated price. If it is a debt, how much is it? Has it been audited, and the amount due ascertained? If it is a debt, this is not the place to present it for payment, or to have its merits examined. If it is a debt, we owe more than we can ever hope to pay, for we owe the widow of every soldier who fought in the War of 1812 precisely the same amount. There is a woman in my neighborhood, the widow of as gallant a man as ever shouldered a musket. He fell in battle. She is as good in every respect as this lady, and is as poor. She is earning her daily bread by her daily labor; but if I were to introduce a bill to appropriate five or ten thousand dollars for her benefit, I should be laughed at, and my bill would not get five votes in this House. There are thousands of widows in the country just such as the one I have spoken of, but we never hear of any of these large debts to them. Sir, this is no debt. The government did not owe it to the deceased when he was alive; it could not contract it after he died. I do not wish to be rude, but I must be plain. Every man in this House knows it is not a debt. We cannot, without the grossest corruption, appropriate this money as the payment of a debt. We have not the semblance of authority to appropriate it as a charity. Mr. Speaker, I have said we have the right to give as much of our own money as we please. I am the poorest man on this floor. I cannot vote for this bill, but I will give one week's pay to the object, and if every member of Congress will do the same, it will amount to more than the bill asks."

He took his seat. Nobody replied. The bill was put upon its passage, and, instead of passing unanimously, as was generally supposed, and as, no doubt, it would, but for that speech, it received but few votes, and, of course, was lost.

Like many other young men, and old ones, too, for that matter, who had not thought upon the subject, I desired the passage of the bill, and felt outraged at its defeat. I determined that I would persuade my friend Crockett to move a reconsideration the next day.

Previous engagements preventing me from seeing Crockett that night, I went early to his room the next morning and found him engaged in addressing and franking letters, a large pile of which lay upon his table.

I broke in upon him rather abruptly, by asking him what devil had possessed him to make that speech and defeat that bill yesterday. Without turning his head or looking up from his work, he replied:

"You see that I am very busy now; take a seat and cool yourself. I will be through in a few minutes, and then I will tell you all about it."

He continued his employment for about ten minutes, and when he had finished he turned to me and said:

"Now, sir, I will answer your question. But thereby hangs a tale, and one of considerable length, to which you will have to listen."

I listened, and this is the tale which I heard:

Several years ago I was one evening standing on the steps of the Capitol with some other members of Congress, when our attention was attracted by a great light over in Georgetown. It was evidently a large fire. We jumped into a hack and drove over as fast as we could. When we got there, I went to work, and I never worked as hard in my life as I did there for several hours. But, in spite of all that could be done, many houses were burned and many families made homeless, and, besides, some of them had lost all but the clothes they had on. The weather was very cold, and when I saw so many women and children suffering, I felt that something ought to be done for them, and everybody else seemed to feel the same way.

The next morning a bill was introduced appropriating $20,000 for their relief. We put aside all other business and rushed it through as soon as it could be done. I said everybody felt as I did. That was not quite so; for, though they perhaps sympathized as deeply with the sufferers as I did, there were a few of the members who did not think we had the right to indulge our sympathy or excite our charity at the expense of anybody but ourselves. They opposed the bill, and upon its passage demanded the yeas and nays. There were not enough of them to sustain the call, but many of us wanted our names to appear in favor of what we considered a praiseworthy measure, and we voted with them to sustain it. So the yeas and nays were recorded, and my name appeared on the journals in favor of the bill.

The next summer, when it began to be time to think about the election, I concluded I would take a scout around among the boys of my district. I had no opposition there, but, as the election was some time off, I did not know what might turn up, and I thought it was best to let the boys know that I had not forgot them, and that going to Congress had not made me too proud to go to see them.

So I put a couple of shirts and a few twists of tobacco into my saddlebags, and put out. I had been out about a week and had found things going very smoothly, when, riding one day in a part of my district in which I was more of a stranger than any other, I saw a man in a field plowing and coming toward the road. I gauged my gait so that we should meet as he came to the fence. As he came up I spoke to the man. He replied politely, but, as I thought, rather coldly, and was about turning his horse for another furrow when I said to him: "Don't be in such a hurry, my friend; I want to have a little talk with you, and get better acquainted."

He replied: "I am very busy, and have but little time to talk, but if it does not take too long, I will listen to what you have to say."

I began: "Well, friend, I am one of those unfortunate beings called candidates, and – "

"'Yes, I know you; you are Colonel Crockett. I have seen you once before, and voted for you the last time you were elected. I suppose you are out electioneering now, but you had better not waste your time or mine. I shall not vote for you again.'

This was a sockdolager... I begged him to tell me what was the matter.

"Well, Colonel, it is hardly worthwhile to waste time or words upon it. I do not see how it can be mended, but you gave a vote last winter which shows that either you have not capacity to understand the Constitution, or that you are wanting in honesty and firmness to be guided by it. In either case you are not the man to represent me. But I beg your pardon for expressing it in that way. I did not intend to avail myself of the privilege of the Constitution to speak plainly to a candidate for the purpose of insulting or wounding you. I intend by it only to say that your understanding of the Constitution is very different from mine; and I will say to you what, but for my rudeness, I should not have said, that I believe you to be honest. But an understanding of the Constitution different from mine I cannot overlook, because the Constitution, to be worth anything, must be held sacred, and rigidly observed in all its provisions. The man who wields power and misinterprets it is the more dangerous the more honest he is."

"I admit the truth of all you say, but there must be some mistake about it, for I do not remember that I gave any vote last winter upon any constitutional question."

"No, Colonel, there's no mistake. Though I live here in the backwoods and seldom go from home, I take the papers from Washington and read very carefully all the proceedings of Congress. My papers say that last winter you voted for a bill to appropriate $20,000 to some sufferers by a fire in Georgetown. Is that true?"

"Certainly it is, and I thought that was the last vote which anybody in the world would have found fault with."

"Well, Colonel, where do you find in the Constitution any authority to give away the public money in charity?"

Here was another sockdolager; for, when I began to think about it, I could not remember a thing in the Constitution that authorized it. I found I must take another tack, so I said:

"Well, my friend; I may as well own up. You have got me there. But certainly nobody will complain that a great and rich country like ours should give the insignificant sum of $20,000 to relieve its suffering women and children, particularly with a full and overflowing Treasury, and I am sure, if you had been there, you would have done just as I did."

"It is not the amount, Colonel, that I complain of; it is the principle. In the first place, the government ought to have in the Treasury no more than enough for its legitimate purposes. But that has nothing to do with the question. The power of collecting and disbursing money at pleasure is the most dangerous power that can be entrusted to man, particularly under our system of collecting revenue by a tariff, which reaches every man in the country, no matter how poor he may be, and the poorer he is the more he pays in proportion to his means. What is worse, it presses upon him without his knowledge where the weight centers, for there is not a man in the United States who can ever guess how much he pays to the government. So you see, that while you are contributing to relieve one, you are drawing it from thousands who are even worse off than he. If you had the right to give anything, the amount was simply a matter of discretion with you, and you had as much right to give $20,000,000 as $20,000. If you have the right to give to one, you have the right to give to all; and, as the Constitution neither defines charity nor stipulates the amount, you are at liberty to give to any and everything which you may believe, or profess to believe, is a charity, and to any amount you may think proper. You will very easily perceive what a wide door this would open for fraud and corruption and favoritism, on the one hand, and for robbing the people on the other. No, Colonel, Congress has no right to give charity. Individual members may give as much of their own money as they please, but they have no right to touch a dollar of the public money for that purpose. If twice as many houses had been burned in this county as in Georgetown, neither you nor any other member of Congress would have thought of appropriating a dollar for our relief. There are about two hundred and forty members of Congress. If they had shown their sympathy for the sufferers by contributing each one week's pay, it would have made over $13,000. There are plenty of wealthy men in and around Washington who could have given $20,000 without depriving themselves of even a luxury of life. The Congressmen chose to keep their own money, which, if reports be true, some of them spend not very creditably; and the people about Washington, no doubt, applauded you for relieving them from the necessity of giving by giving what was not yours to give. The people have delegated to Congress, by the Constitution, the power to do certain things. To do these, it is authorized to collect and pay moneys, and for nothing else. Everything beyond this is usurpation, and a violation of the Constitution."

I have given you an imperfect account of what he said. Long before he was through, I was convinced that I had done wrong. He wound up by saying:

"So you see, Colonel, you have violated the Constitution in what I consider a vital point. It is a precedent fraught with danger to the country, for when Congress once begins to stretch its power beyond the limits of the Constitution, there is no limit to it, and no security for the people. I have no doubt you acted honestly, but that does not make it any better, except as far as you are personally concerned, and you see that I cannot vote for you."

I tell you I felt streaked. I saw if I should have opposition, and this man should go talking, he would set others to talking, and in that district I was a gone fawn-skin. I could not answer him, and the fact is, I did not want to. But I must satisfy him, and I said to him:

"Well, my friend, you hit the nail upon the head when you said I had not sense enough to understand the Constitution. I intended to be guided by it, and thought I had studied it full. I have heard many speeches in Congress about the powers of Congress, but what you have said there at your plow has got more hard, sound sense in it than all the fine speeches I ever heard. If I had ever taken the view of it that you have, I would have put my head into the fire before I would have given that vote; and if you will forgive me and vote for me again, if I ever vote for another unconstitutional law I wish I may be shot."

He laughingly replied:

"Yes, Colonel, you have sworn to that once before, but I will trust you again upon one condition. You say that you are convinced that your vote was wrong. Your acknowledgment of it will do more good than beating you for it. If, as you go around the district, you will tell people about this vote, and that you are satisfied it was wrong, I will not only vote for you, but will do what I can to keep down opposition, and, perhaps, I may exert some little influence in that way."

"If I don't," said I, "I wish I may be shot; and to convince you that I am in earnest in what I say, I will come back this way in a week or ten days, and if you will get up a gathering of the people, I will make a speech to them. Get up a barbecue, and I will pay for it."

"No, Colonel, we are not rich people in this section, but we have plenty of provisions to contribute for a barbecue, and some to spare for those who have none. The push of crops will be over in a few days, and we can then afford a day for a barbecue. This is Thursday; I will see to getting it up on Saturday week. Come to my house on Friday, and we will go together, and I promise you a very respectable crowd to see and hear you."

"Well, I will be here. But one thing more before I say good-bye. I must know your name."

"My name is Bunce."

"Not Horatio Bunce?"

"Yes."

"Well, Mr. Bunce, I never saw you before, though you say you have seen me; but I know you very well. I am glad I have met you, and very proud that I may hope to have you for my friend. You must let me shake your hand before I go."

We shook hands and parted.

It was one of the luckiest hits of my life that I met him. He mingled but little with the public, but was widely known for his remarkable intelligence and incorruptible integrity, and for a heart brimful and running over with kindness and benevolence, which showed themselves not only in words but in acts. He was the oracle of the whole country around him, and his fame had extended far beyond the circle of his immediate acquaintance. Though I had never met him before, I had heard much of him, and but for this meeting it is very likely I should have had opposition, and had been beaten. One thing is very certain, no man could now stand up in that district under such a vote.

At the appointed time I was at his house, having told our conversation to every crowd I had met, and to every man I stayed all night with, and I found that it gave the people an interest and a confidence in me stronger than I had ever seen manifested before.

Though I was considerably fatigued when I reached his house, and, under ordinary circumstances, should have gone early to bed, I kept him up until midnight, talking about the principles and affairs of government, and got more real, true knowledge of them than I had got all my life before.

I have told you Mr. Bunce converted me politically. He came nearer converting me religiously than I had ever been before. He did not make a very good Christian of me, as you know; but he has wrought upon my mind a conviction of the truth of Christianity, and upon my feelings a reverence for its purifying and elevating power such as I had never felt before.

I have known and seen much of him since, for I respect him – no, that is not the word – I reverence and love him more than any living man, and I go to see him two or three times every year; and I will tell you, sir, if everyone who professes to be a Christian lived and acted and enjoyed it as he does, the religion of Christ would take the world by storm.

But to return to my story. The next morning we went to the barbecue, and, to my surprise, found about a thousand men there. I met a good many whom I had not known before, and they and my friend introduced me around until I had got pretty well acquainted – at least, they all knew me.

In due time notice was given that I would speak to them. They gathered around a stand that had been erected. I opened my speech by saying:

"Fellow citizens – I present myself before you today feeling like a new man. My eyes have lately been opened to truths which ignorance or prejudice, or both, had heretofore hidden from my view. I feel that I can today offer you the ability to render you more valuable service than I have ever been able to render before. I am here today more for the purpose of acknowledging my error than to seek your votes. That I should make this acknowledgment is due to myself as well as to you. Whether you will vote for me is a matter for your consideration only."

I went on to tell them about the fire and my vote for the appropriation as I have told it to you, and then told them why I was satisfied it was wrong. I closed by saying:

"And now, fellow citizens, it remains only for me to tell you that the most of the speech you have listened to with so much interest was simply a repetition of the arguments by which your neighbor, Mr. Bunce, convinced me of my error.

"It is the best speech I ever made in my life, but he is entitled to the credit of it. And now I hope he is satisfied with his convert and that he will get up here and tell you so."

He came upon the stand and said:

"Fellow citizens – It affords me great pleasure to comply with the request of Colonel Crockett. I have always considered him a thoroughly honest man, and I am satisfied that he will faithfully perform all that he has promised you today."

He went down, and there went up from the crowd such a shout for Davy Crockett as his name never called forth before.

I am not much given to tears, but I was taken with a choking then and felt some big drops rolling down my cheeks. And I tell you now that the remembrance of those few words spoken by such a man, and the honest, hearty shout they produced, is worth more to me than all the honors I have received and all the reputation I have ever made, or ever shall make, as a member of Congress.

"Now, Sir," concluded Crockett, "you know why I made that speech yesterday. I have had several thousand copies of it printed and was directing them to my constituents when you came in.

"There is one thing now to which I will call your attention. You remember that I proposed to give a week's pay. There are in that House many very wealthy men – men who think nothing of spending a week's pay, or a dozen of them for a dinner or a wine party when they have something to accomplish by it. Some of those same men made beautiful speeches upon the great debt of gratitude which the country owed the deceased – a debt which could not be paid by money, particularly so insignificant a sum as $10,000, when weighed against the honor of the nation. Yet not one of them responded to my proposition. Money with them is nothing but trash when it is to come out of the people. But it is the one great thing for which most of them are striving, and many of them sacrifice honor, integrity, and justice to obtain it."


Sunday, June 7, 2020

Who wants free ice cream?


The Presidential election was heating up, and some grade school children were showing an interest.
The teacher decided that having an election for a class president would be a good civics lesson.
The students would choose the nominees.
The nominees would make campaign speeches, and the class then would vote.
There were many nominations.

Larry and Kenny were picked as finalists.

The day arrived for them to make their speeches.
Larry went first. He had specific ideas about how to make the class a better place, and promised to do his very best. Everyone applauded.
Then Kenny spoke. He said, "If you will vote for me, I will give everybody ice cream."
The class went wild, screaming, "Yes! Yes! We want ice cream!".
An intense discussion followed. How did he plan to pay for the ice cream? Kenny didn't know.
Would his parents buy it, or would the class pay for it? Kenny didn't know.
The class really didn't care. They just wanted ice cream.
Larry was forgotten.
Kenny won by a landslide.
Sometimes, elections are like that.
So, when we vote, let's do so on the basis of positive principles and not on puffed-up promises and platitudes.
Please visit www.facebook.com/LarryDKump and my other posts on this website for more about the principles of good governance, and share this post with others, asking them to also go and do likewise. 🤔
And may God bless you all real good! 😍

Saturday, June 6, 2020

The Genesis of West Virginia

God was nowhere to be seen for six days.

Finally, Michael, the Archangel, found him resting on the seventh day.

Michael asked God, "Where have you been?".

God smiled with deep satisfaction and pointed downward through the clouds, saying, "Michael, look what I created!".

Puzzled, Michael asked, "What is it?".

"It's a planet", replied God, "and I'm going to call it Earth, and it has balance."

"Balance?", said Michael, "What's that?".

God then explained, pointing out the different areas of Earth.

"For example, this area is a place of great forests, but this other area is covered with rocky mountains. Over there is a region of many lakes and streams, but over here is a broad grassland.".

He continued, "This area is hot and humid, but over here it is cold and covered with ice.".

Michael, impressed with God's handiwork, then pointed to one particular spot and said, "What about that area?".

"That's West Virginia, the most glorious spot on earth. There are beautiful mountains, rivers and streams, lakes, forests, hills, and plains. The people I've placed there are good looking, modest, intelligent, and humorous. They are sociable, hard-working, high achievers, peaceable, and producers of good things.".

Gasping in awe and wonder, Michael then asked, But what about balance? You said that there would be balance.".

God ruefully smiled and explained, "Over there, just East of West Virginia is Washington, D.C.. Wait until you see those people and that place!".

For information about good governance issues, take a moment to visit www.facebook.com/LarryDKump, and ask others to go and do likewise.

Friday, June 5, 2020

The Kump Family Castle




The Kump Family Castle, ”Schloss Matzen”, in Austria (no foolin’!)

 There simply is no truth to the rumor that there is a Duchy of Kumpsylvania in Austria. 
There’s simply just no “Mouse that Roared” there.

More about “Schloss Matzen”: One of Europe’s most romantic medieval castles, lies high in the Austrian Tyrol, where the air is crisp and clean. The location is Reith im Alpbachtal, in the Tyrolean Alps of western Austria, approximately 30 miles/50 km northeast of Innsbruck, about a 90 minute drive or train from Munich or Salzburg (it is less than 5 minutes drive from the nearest train station and Autobahn exit). The castle was first referred to in 1167 and has been privately owned ever since. It’s history also includes highlights such as its Baroque chapel being twice consecrated by bishops who would go on to become Pope. Teddy Roosevelt also visited it at the turn of the century, as a hunting companion of the former owner. The size of the building is approx. 20,000 square feet, including the 6 story tower, on a 2.4 hectare (approx. 6 acre) lot, half-surrounded by an Austrian nationally-protected public park. There are approximately 60 rooms, depending on how you count rooms (there are several long, arcade passageways), including 12 guest rooms appointed with antique furnishing and private bathrooms with modern heating, plumbing and electricity. It is connected to the local sewer system and has its own private spring water supply 

-West Virginia Delegate Larry D. Kump, District #59 (Berkeley-Morgan counties)
www.LarryKump.com

Republican Assemby endorses Kump!

June 5, 2020

Dear Larry Kump,

     Congratulations! The West Virginia Republican Assembly has voted to endorse you in the upcoming June 9th, 2020 primary election. Because of your support for the second amendment, tax relief, right to life, school choice, religious freedom, and other conservative values, we believe you are the best candidate in your race.  

     The West Virginia Republican Assembly is a chapter under the National Federation of Republican Assemblies, which is a grassroots organization formed in 1934 committed to furthering the conservative movement. We endorse candidates who support the conservative platform including issues such as limited government, lower taxes, free market capitalism, a strong defense, and the right to life. Former members of the NFRA include President Ronald Reagan and conservative activist Phyllis Schlafly. 

     We encourage fellow Republicans to vote for you and other conservative candidates that will fight to protect our constitutional rights and preserve the values that have made America great. If elected to the West Virginia General Assembly, we are confident that you will vote like a true conservative.

Sincerely, 

Elliot Simon, President West Virginia Republican Assembly 
 

In the WV House of Delegates Chamber



 This photo was taken, while I was speaking during a previous Summer legislative interim committee meeting, as the sunshine streamed through the chamber skylight and darkened my photo gray transition eyeglasses.
 For more about issues in support of good governance, visit my www.LarryKump.us and www.LarryKump.com websites, and ask others to go and do likewise.
 Until then, and for sure and for certain, may God bless you all real good!

Tuesday, June 2, 2020

My West Virginia Home

The lines below were written long ago by another.
Even so, they continue to express well, the feelings of my amazing wife Cheryl's and my hearts (also including the heart of our Bodacious Bob, the Wonder Dog), about our home and hearth, here in Falling Waters, West Virginia:
"God gave all men all earth to love,
But, since our hearts are small,
Ordained for each, one spot should prove
Beloved over all."
For more about my other thoughts, please visit my posts @ www.LarryKump.com and www.LarryKump.us , and ask others to go and do likewise.
Meanwhile, and for sure and certain, may God bless you all real good! 🥰

Monday, June 1, 2020

A Life Lesson from a Little Frog



 For those of us who wax weary and worried about our struggle on behalf of  individual liberty and personal empowerment and accountability, consider this life  lesson from a little frog:

 Two  frogs were on their merry way to the big frog hoe-down. While they were traveling along a rutted road, they slipped and fell into one of those deep ruts.

After exerting all of his strength, the bigger of the two frogs was able to jump out of the rut. But, try as he might, the smaller frog just wasn't strong enough to escape.

 Finally, the smaller frog told his friend to go to the hoe-down without him... and he did.

However, hours later, his froggy friend was amazed to see a very tired little frog walk into the frog dance hall.

"How did you manage to get out of that rut?", he asked.

The little frog simply replied: "A truck came along. I had to!"

And so it goes for each of us........

For more about life lessons in good governance, visit www.LarryKump.com and www.LarryKump.us.

Meanwhile, and for sure and for certain, may God bless you all real good!

-West Virginia Delegate Larry D. Kump, District #59 (Berkeley-Morgan counties)

Sunday, May 31, 2020

Mooney endorses Kump!


  "I am proud to endorse for re-election West Virginia Delegate Larry D. Kump, District #59 (Berkeley-Morgan counties). Larry D. Kump is a true liberty minded conservative Republican. Larry and his wife Cheryl are pro-family values, pro-life, pro-2nd Amendment, pro-property rights, and pro-President Trump. Please vote to re-elect Larry D. Kump to the West Virginia House of Delegates! -Congressman Alex X. Mooney, United States 2nd Congressional District of West Virginia"
Postscript from Delegate Larry D. Kump: Our West Virginia 2nd District Congressman Alex X. Mooney has been my friend and fellow conservative for many years, and his wonderful Mother Lala also is dear to me and my wife Cheryl. For sure and for certain,, my previous and ongoing endorsement of the re-election of Congressman Alex X. Mooney is with great enthusiasm and without hesitation. If you have not already done so, by voting early or absentee, vote tomorrow on Tuesday, June 9th! Polls are open tomorrow from 6:30 AM to 7:30 PM. 🤔 May God bless you all real good!

Saturday, May 23, 2020

An Invitation for You...


Dear Friend and Mountaineer Citizen,

 After previously coming out of retirement, serving as an elected Delegate from 2010-2014 and also from 2018 to currently, I have carefully and prayerfully pondered a steady stream of personal pleadings for me to once again answer the call to return to duty.
 Once again, I'm doing this as a Republican candidate for re-election to the West Virginia House of Delegates, District #59 (Berkeley-Morgan counties).
 As a battle tested conservative and liberty-minded Christian, living for about thirty years in the same modest home within the district, I'm ready to again continue to take up the gauntlet on your behalf.
 Working together to stay independent, we must not give up our fight for integrity, accountability, and transparency in our state government.
 That's why West Virginia deserves firm and faithful legislators, who will stand up and work faithfully to defend our paychecks, our values, and our choices.
 Please support me in this fight to protect West Virginia and the values that have made America great.
 As your Delegate, you can be sure and for certain that I will continue to stand up to the "go along and get along" crowd in our State Capitol, and devoutly defend our shared West Virginia values.
 And so, you always can count on me to stand up and speak out on behalf of:

* Reducing taxes and the top-heavy and centralized power of our state government, in order to leave more money in your pocket and more choices in your life.

* Making educating the next generation of Mountain State citizens a top priority. It's vital that we strengthen education in West Virginia, ending the Common Core Curriculum (by any name), and getting rid of our top heavy education bureaucracy.

* Defending our traditional West Virginia family values and protecting our God given freedoms, including lives of the unborn, and putting an end to government's intrusion into our lives and liberty. By the way, that's why "West Virginians for Life" has endorsed my re-election.

 * Continuing my support and sponsorship of reasonable "term limits" for career politicians. I also have and will continue to support and sponsor legislation to eliminate pension benefits for our West Virginia citizen legislators.

* Protecting our Constitutional Rights, especially the 2nd Amendment and all of our "Bill or Rights"...in other words, all of our Divinely inspired Constitution! That's just some of the reasons that the West Virginia Farm Bureau and the National Rifle Association has endorsed my re-election, plus the West Virginia Citizens Defense League has given me an "A" rating and named me as a "consistent supporter" of the 2nd Amendment. (See even more endorsements of my re-election @ this website)

 But, I can't take a stand and fight in Charleston for you without your support, not only for you and your family but for all of us in West Virginia. 
 And so, working together to remain independent,  I am and always will be,
 Yours for better governance,
 Delegate Larry D. Kump

Postscriptum: If you believe, as I do, that West Virginia needs strong leadership to defend our traditional West Virginia values and bring real prosperity to our state, then please also donate generously to my re-election campaign. (A personal donation of $100 to $250 is suggested, but whether your contribution is magnanimous or modest, please simply give whatever you and your family can afford.)

Send your contribution to-

Friends of Larry D. Kump
P. O. Box 1131
Falling Waters, West Virginia 25419-1131

 Visit my other posts on this website, and also visit www.LarryKump.com for more of my stand on principles over politics. Also see my biography @ this website.

Please share this post with others, asking them also to go and do likewise with still others.

And may God bless you all real good!

Footnote: This message is not intended as a campaign contribution solicitation to any West Virginia public employee, and was authorized by "Friends of Larry D. Kump".