Dedication

This website is devoutly dedicated to all of Larry's friends and associates, both early and late, who have influenced and mentored him. However, it also should be noted that, being who they are, a majority of them have been late most of the time.

Saturday, December 30, 2017

Reenforcement from Russ

I have known Larry D. Kump for close to 30 years and have never known him to be anything but upright, honest, full of integrity, loyal, moral, and compassionate.

Even in times of trial on a personal front, Larry never complained or felt sorry for himself. Instead, he went out of his way to make sure the needs and feelings of others were taken care of.

Spend an hour with him and you will walk away feeling like you have known him your entire life.

His dedication to his profession, his fellow co-workers and friends is just the qualities I look for in a leader. He will not bow down to outside pressure when he believes in something. He will fight to the finish to ensure fairness and equity for everyone is accomplished.

Russ Hess

Footnote: Campaign contributions to "Friends of Larry D. Kump" (P.O. Box 1131, Falling Waters, WV 25419) will be put to prudent use in support of good governance.

Tuesday, December 26, 2017

Singhas Sings Out

The following letter to the editor was published in the Martinsburg Journal newspaper on Saturday, January 4th, 2014:

Not long ago, I couldn't get enough of politics. I loved the idea of our system of government. I tried to get people engaged in the issues. I was so proud of the idea that in this country, everyone had the right to be involved with the election of our local, as well as our national, leadership.

I hate to admit it, but for a while, I all but checked-out. The idea that someone like Barack Obama with a world view so much different than what I thought was most Americans, and a campaign promise to "fundamentally change" our country to reflect that view, that he could be elected to the highest office in land not only once, but twice, was beyond comprehension to me. After he was elected to a second term, I truly felt there was little hope for this nation going forward. Not because of him, but because the people of this nation would elect him.

But there is hope, one hope. But only if we replace career politicians that have a record of pandering to special interests. Those who pick out certain groups and say anything that will get them excited enough to win their vote. Those that would censor (or try to) any opposing, or objective views of their record or their true character. Those who disregard our Constitution as if they have a better idea. Those who are so politically motivated that votes are more important than the general health of our country. We need to know who these politicians are. We need to know their record, who their friends are and where there heart is.

I've known Delegate Larry Kump for close to 20 years and I can attest that this is a man with absolute integrity. An independent thinker. A man who loves people, the Lord, this state and this country. He is a man of action, who has the courage to stand on his convictions and a record to back it up.

Someone once said "all politics is local." If that's the case, then I hope we will start cleaning up the mess we have by recognizing local leaders like Delegate Larry Kump for the honorable service he's given the 59th District and the State of West Virginia. With people like Larry Kump representing West Virginians, we can rest assured we have someone fighting for our Constitutional rights.

With primary elections coming up this coming May, It's so important for thinking people to stand behind elected leaders with a proven record of personal and constitutional integrity. When you know someone you can count on to do the right thing, you stand behind them. The people of the 59th district need to re-elect Delegate Larry Kump, a man with a record of fighting for the rights of all West Virginians.

Ed Singhas
Martinsburg, West Virginia

Wednesday, December 6, 2017

Firearms Safety?

It is unusual for me to be a proponent of additional government involvement in our lives.
Far too often, otherwise well meaning elected officials end up restricting our God given rights and also impede our paths to prosperity.
However, this is a proposal that our West Virginia State Legislature and school boards would do well to adopt.
A generation or so ago, many West Virginia school students were given firearms safety training as part of their education. It is my understanding that this training was conducted by the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources Police.
Let's bring that back!

Larry D. Kump
Former West Virginia State Legislator (2010 - 2014)
Falling Waters, West Virginia

Postscriptum: Please share this message with others, and also visit www.facebook.com/LarryDKump for more about this and other issues!

Sunday, November 5, 2017

About God & Governance

After wondering and worrying about the issues and those who seek our election validation and votes in 2018, especially after my previous Facebook page posts about good governance, a prayerful poem by Meade McGuire came into my thoughts:

"Father, where shall I work today?"

And my love flowed warm and free.

Then He pointed out a tiny spot

And said, "Tend that for me".

I answered quickly, "Oh no; not that!

Why, no one would ever see,

No matter how well my work was done;

Not that little place for me."

And the word He spake, it was not stern;

He answered me tenderly:

"Ah, little one, search that heart of thine.

Art thou working for them or for me?

Nazareth was a little place,

And so was Galilee."

And so, this 2018 election season, as we grapple with the issues and the candidates, let us do so prayerfully, that Providence may chart our choices.

And may God bless you all real good!

Larry D. Kump,

Falling Waters, West Virginia

Visit the other posts on this website, and also my Facebook page (www.facebook.com/LarryDKump) for more of this about that.

Please share this message with others, and ask them to go and do likewise!

Friday, November 3, 2017

"Footloose"?

A previous editorial in our local "The Journal" daily newspaper, which lamented "loose spending" by West Virginia legislators and inaccurate guesstimates regarding the unintended consequences of new laws, was and is right on target.

This is a major problem, and I pledge to continue to press forward to demand independent cost analyses of all legislative proposals.

It's only right, and Mountaineers deserve better.

After all, "Footloose" should only be a movie, and not a means to defraud West Virginia citizens.

Larry D. Kump
Former West Virginia State Legislator (2010 - 2014)
Falling Waters, West Virginia

Please visit www.facebook.com/LarryDKump for more of this about that and other issues, and ask others to go and do likewise!

Thursday, November 2, 2017

From My Green Beret Friends

Dear Larry,
This is the humble letter that we put together. We Green Berets have seen many countries that have been dominated by tyranny by the lack of power of the people to defend themselves from despots. I'll let the letter speak for itself...
Tom


29 Jan 2013

Protecting the Second Amendment – Why all Americans Should Be Concerned

We are current or former Army Reserve, National Guard, and active duty US Army Special Forces soldiers (Green Berets). We have all taken an oath to "...support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same.…" The Constitution of the United States is without a doubt the single greatest document in the history of mankind, codifying the fundamental principle of governmental power and authority being derived from and granted through the consent of the governed. Our Constitution established a system of governance that preserves, protects, and holds sacrosanct the individual rights and primacy of the governed as well as providing for the explicit protection of the governed from governmental tyranny and/or oppression. We have witnessed the insidious and iniquitous effects of tyranny and oppression on people all over the world. We and our forebears have embodied and personified our organizational motto, De Oppresso Liber [To Free the Oppressed], for more than a half century as we have fought, shed blood, and died in the pursuit of freedom for the oppressed.

Like you, we are also loving and caring fathers and grandfathers. Like you, we have been stunned, horrified, and angered by the tragedies of Columbine, Virginia Tech, Aurora, Fort Hood, and Sandy Hook; and like you, we are searching for solutions to the problem of gun-related crimes in our society. Many of us are educators in our second careers and have a special interest to find a solution to this problem. However, unlike much of the current vox populi reactions to this tragedy, we offer a different perspective.

First, we need to set the record straight on a few things. The current debate is over so-called "assault weapons" and high capacity magazines. The terms "assault weapon" and "assault rifle" are often confused. According to Bruce H. Kobayashi and Joseph E. Olson, writing in the Stanford Law and Policy Review, "Prior to 1989, the term 'assault weapon' did not exist in the lexicon of firearms. It is a political term, developed by anti-gun publicists to expand the category of assault rifles."

The M4A1 carbine is a U.S. military service rifle - it is an assault rifle. The AR-15 is not an assault rifle. The "AR" in its name does not stand for "Assault Rifle" - it is the designation from the first two letters of the manufacturer's name – ArmaLite Corporation. The AR-15 is designed so that it cosmetically looks like the M4A1 carbine assault rifle, but it is impossible to configure the AR-15 to be a fully automatic assault rifle. It is a single shot semi-automatic rifle that can fire between 45 and 60 rounds per minute depending on the skill of the operator. The M4A1 can fire up to 950 rounds per minute. In 1986, the federal government banned the import or manufacture of new fully automatic firearms for sale to civilians. Therefore, the sale of assault rifles are already banned or heavily restricted!

The second part of the current debate is over "high capacity magazines" capable of holding more than 10 rounds in the magazine. As experts in military weapons of all types, it is our considered opinion that reducing magazine capacity from 30 rounds to 10 rounds will only require an additional 6 -8 seconds to change two empty 10 round magazines with full magazines. Would an increase of 6 –8 seconds make any real difference to the outcome in a mass shooting incident? In our opinion it would not. Outlawing such "high capacity magazines" would, however, outlaw a class of firearms that are "in common use". As such this would be in contravention to the opinion expressed by the U.S. Supreme Court recent decisions.

Moreover, when the Federal Assault Weapons Ban became law in 1994, manufacturers began retooling to produce firearms and magazines that were compliant. One of those ban-compliant firearms was the Hi-Point 995, which was sold with ten-round magazines. In 1999, five years into the Federal Assault Weapons Ban, the Columbine High School massacre occurred. One of the perpetrators, Eric Harris, was armed with a Hi-Point 995. Undeterred by the ten-round capacity of his magazines, Harris simply brought more of them: thirteen magazines would be found in the massacre's aftermath. Harris fired 96 rounds before killing himself.

Now that we have those facts straight, in our opinion, it is too easy to conclude that the problem is guns and that the solution to the problem is more and stricter gun control laws. For politicians, it is politically expedient to take that position and pass more gun control laws and then claim to constituents that they have done the right thing in the interest of protecting our children. Who can argue with that? Of course we all want to find a solution. But, is the problem really guns? Would increasing gun regulation solve the problem? Did we outlaw cars to combat drunk driving?

What can we learn from experiences with this issue elsewhere? We cite the experience in Great Britain. Despite the absence of a "gun culture", Great Britain, with one-fifth the population of the U.S., has experienced mass shootings that are eerily similar to those we have experienced in recent years. In 1987 a lone gunman killed 18 people in Hungerford. What followed was the Firearms Act of 1988 making registration mandatory and banning semi-automatic guns and pump-action shotguns. Despite this ban, on March 13, 1996 a disturbed 43-year old former scout leader, Thomas Hamilton, murdered 16 school children aged five and six and a teacher at a primary school in Dunblane, Scotland. Within a year and a half the Firearms Act was amended to ban all private ownership of hand guns. After both shootings there were amnesty periods resulting in the surrender of thousands of firearms and ammunition. Despite having the toughest gun control laws in the world, gun related crimes increased in 2003 by 35% over the previous year with firearms used in 9,974 recorded crimes in the preceding 12 months. Gun related homicides were up 32% over the same period. Overall, gun related crime had increased 65% since the Dunblane massacre and implementation of the toughest gun control laws in the developed world. In contrast, in 2009 (5 years after the Federal Assault Weapons Ban expired) total firearm related homicides in the U.S. declined by 9% from the 2005 high (Source: "FBI Uniform Crime Reporting Master File, Table 310, Murder Victims – Circumstances and Weapons Used or Cause of Death: 2000-2009").

Are there unintended consequences to stricter gun control laws and the politically expedient path that we have started down?

In a recent op-ed piece in the San Francisco Chronicle, Brett Joshpe stated that "Gun advocates will be hard-pressed to explain why the average American citizen needs an assault weapon with a high-capacity magazine other than for recreational purposes."We agree with Kevin D. Williamson (National Review Online, December 28, 2012): "The problem with this argument is that there is no legitimate exception to the Second Amendment right that excludes military-style weapons, because military-style weapons are precisely what the Second Amendment guarantees our right to keep and bear."

"The purpose of the Second Amendment is to secure our ability to oppose enemies foreign and domestic, a guarantee against disorder and tyranny. Consider the words of Supreme Court Justice Joseph Story": 'The importance of this article will scarcely be doubted by any persons, who have duly reflected upon the subject. The militia is the natural defense of a free country against sudden foreign invasions, domestic insurrections, and domestic usurpations of power by rulers. It is against sound policy for a free people to keep up large military establishments and standing armies in time of peace, both from the enormous expenses, with which they are attended, and the facile means, which they afford to ambitious and unprincipled rulers, to subvert the government, or trample upon the rights of the people. The right of the citizens to keep and bear arms has justly been considered, as the palladium of the liberties of a republic; since it offers a strong moral check against the usurpation and arbitrary power of rulers; and will generally, even if these are successful in the first instance, enable the people to resist and triumph over them.'

The Second Amendment has been ruled to specifically extend to firearms "in common use" by the military by the U.S. Supreme Court ruling in U.S. v Miller (1939). In Printz v U.S. (1997) Justice Thomas wrote: "In Miller we determined that the Second Amendment did not guarantee a citizen's right to possess a sawed-off shot gun because that weapon had not been shown to be "ordinary military equipment" that could "could contribute to the common defense".

A citizen's right to keep and bear arms for personal defense unconnected with service in a militia has been reaffirmed in the U.S. Supreme Court decision (District of Columbia, et al. v Heller, 2008). The Court Justice Scalia wrote in the majority opinion: "The Second Amendment protects an individual right to possess a firearm unconnected with service in a militia, and to use that arm for traditionally lawful purposes, such as self-defense within the home.". Justice Scalia went on to define a militia as "… comprised all males physically capable of acting in concert for the common defense …."

"The Anti-Federalists feared that the Federal Government would disarm the people in order to disable this citizens' militia, enabling a politicized standing army or a select militia to rule. The response was to deny Congress power to abridge the ancient right of individuals to keep and bear arms, so that the ideal of a citizens' militia would be preserved." he explained.

On September 13, 1994, the Federal Assault Weapons Ban went into effect. A Washington Post editorial published two days later was candid about the ban's real purpose:"[N]o one should have any illusions about what was accomplished [by the ban]. Assault weapons play a part in only a small percentage of crime. The provision is mainly symbolic; its virtue will be if it turns out to be, as hoped, a stepping stone to broader gun control."

In a challenge to the authority of the Federal government to require State and Local Law Enforcement to enforce Federal Law (Printz v United States) the U.S. Supreme Court rendered a decision in 1997. For the majority opinion Justice Scalia wrote: "…. this Court never has sanctioned explicitly a federal command to the States to promulgate and enforce laws and regulations When we were at last confronted squarely with a federal statute that unambiguously required the States to enact or administer a federal regulatory program, our decision should have come as no surprise….. It is an essential attribute of the States' retained sovereignty that they remain independent and autonomous within their proper sphere of authority."

So why should non-gun owners, a majority of Americans, care about maintaining the 2nd Amendment right for citizens to bear arms of any kind?

The answer is "The Battle of Athens, TN". The Cantrell family had controlled the economy and politics of McMinn County, Tennessee since the 1930s. Paul Cantrell had been Sheriff from 1936 -1940 and in 1942 was elected to the State Senate. His chief deputy, Paul Mansfield, was subsequently elected to two terms as Sheriff. In 1946 returning WWII veterans put up a popular candidate for Sheriff. On August 1 Sheriff Mansfield and 200 "deputies" stormed the post office polling place to take control of the ballot boxes wounding an objecting observer in the process. The veterans bearing military style weapons, laid siege to the Sheriff's office demanding return of the ballot boxes for public counting of the votes as prescribed in Tennessee law. After exchange of gun fire and blowing open the locked doors, the veterans secured the ballot boxes thereby protecting the integrity of the election. And this is precisely why all Americans should be concerned about protecting all of our right to keep and bear arms as guaranteed by the Second Amendment!

Throughout history, disarming the populace has always preceded tyrants' accession of power. Hitler, Stalin, and Mao all disarmed their citizens prior to installing their murderous regimes. At the beginning of our own nation's revolution, one of the first moves made by the British government was an attempt to disarm our citizens. When our Founding Fathers ensured that the 2nd Amendment was made a part of our Constitution, they were not just wasting ink. They were acting to ensure our present security was never forcibly endangered by tyrants, foreign or domestic.

If there is a staggering legal precedent to protect our 2nd Amendment right to keep and bear arms and if stricter gun control laws are not likely to reduce gun related crime, why are we having this debate? Other than making us and our elected representatives feel better because we think that we are doing something to protect our children, these actions will have no effect and will only provide us with a false sense of security.

So, what do we believe will be effective? First, it is important that we recognize that this is not a gun control problem; it is a complex sociological problem. No single course of action will solve the problem. Therefore, it is our recommendation that a series of diverse steps be undertaken, the implementation of which will require patience and diligence to realize an effect. These are as follows:

1. First and foremost we support our Second Amendment right in that "A well regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed".

2. We support State and Local School Boards in their efforts to establish security protocols in whatever manner and form that they deem necessary and adequate. One of the great strengths of our Republic is that State and Local governments can be creative in solving problems. Things that work can be shared. Our point is that no one knows what will work and there is no one single solution, so let's allow the State and Local governments with the input of the citizens to make the decisions. Most recently the Cleburne Independent School District will become the first district in North Texas to consider allowing some teachers to carry concealed guns. We do not opine as to the appropriateness of this decision, but we do support their right to make this decision for themselves.

3. We recommend that Assisted Outpatient Treatment (AOT) laws be passed in every State. AOT is formerly known as Involuntary Outpatient Commitment (IOC) and allows the courts to order certain individuals with mental disorders to comply with treatment while living in the community. In each of the mass shooting incidents the perpetrator was mentally unstable. We also believe that people who have been adjudicated as incompetent should be simultaneously examined to determine whether they should be allowed the right to retain/purchase firearms.

4. We support the return of firearm safety programs to schools along the lines of the successful "Eddie the Eagle" program, which can be taught in schools by Peace Officers or other trained professionals.

5. Recent social psychology research clearly indicates that there is a direct relationship between gratuitously violent movies/video games and desensitization to real violence and increased aggressive behavior particularly in children and young adults (See Nicholas L. Carnagey, et al. 2007. "The effect of video game violence on physiological desensitization to real-life violence" and the references therein. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology 43:489-496). Therefore, we strongly recommend that gratuitous violence in movies and video games be discouraged. War and war-like behavior should not be glorified. Hollywood and video game producers are exploiting something they know nothing about. General Sherman famously said "War is Hell!" Leave war to the Professionals. War is not a game and should not be "sold" as entertainment to our children.

6. We support repeal of the Gun-Free School Zones Act of 1990. This may sound counter-intuitive, but it obviously isn't working. It is our opinion that "Gun-Free Zones" anywhere are too tempting of an environment for the mentally disturbed individual to inflict their brand of horror with little fear of interference. While governmental and non-governmental organizations, businesses, and individuals should be free to implement a Gun-Free Zone if they so choose, they should also assume Tort liability for that decision.

7. We believe that border states should take responsibility for implementation of border control laws to prevent illegal shipments of firearms and drugs. Drugs have been illegal in this country for a long, long time yet the Federal Government manages to seize only an estimated 10% of this contraband at our borders. Given this dismal performance record that is misguided and inept ("Fast and Furious"), we believe that border States will be far more competent at this mission.

8. This is our country, these are our rights. We believe that it is time that we take personal responsibility for our choices and actions rather than abdicate that responsibility to someone else under the illusion that we have done something that will make us all safer. We have a responsibility to stand by our principles and act in accordance with them. Our children are watching and they will follow the example we set.

The undersigned Quiet Professionals hereby humbly stand ever present, ever ready, and ever vigilant.

1100 Green Berets Signed this *Letter

*We have a list of all their names and unlike any MSM outlets we can confirm that over 1100 Green Berets did sign. The list includes Special Forces Major Generals & Special Forces Command Sergeants Major down to the lowest ranking "Green Beret".

A link to another source of the above letter:
http://www.professionalsoldiers.com/forums/showthread.php?t=40772

See my other posts at this website, as well as @ www.facebook.com/LarryDKump, for more about my views and news, including whether I will return to public service in 2018.

Please share this message with others, asking them to go and do likewise with even more others!

Friday, October 20, 2017

Update: Please Read & Respond to this Post's Postscript via Facebook!

Regardless of the merits of the recently approved West Virginia Constitutional Amendment, wherein Mountaineer voters approved the borrowing of $1.6 billion for our road system, there was a deep and disturbing dynamic that also was manifest in that election.

 Alas, voter turnout (about 10% of registered voters, and less than 2% in some areas) was even worse than my previous pessimistic prediction (Please see my September 20th facebook post).

 Was this lack of voter interest and participation yet another indicator of an ongoing and growing lack of voter confidence in and even dismay with the elected leadership of both major political parties?

 Were the upstart 2016 presidential campaigns of Donald J. Trump and Bernard Sanders early barometers of a swirling and spreading storm of citizen calumny about this leadership?

 Are the majority of our citizens not only voting with their feet and walking away from our political leaders, but also now disdaining and disregarding our representative form of governance?

 Where were you on election day?

 I don't know.

 I'm just askin'.

Postscript: Visit www.facebook.com/LarryDKump and chime in on my October 22nd, 2017 reposting of my letter to the editor of "The Journal" daily newspaper, with your response to my question regarding the timing of West Virginia's "special elections". My inquiring mind needs to know!

Editorial note: Please see my other posts about good governance issues on this website and also on Facebook (www/facebook/com/LarryDKump). Please share this message with others, asking them to go and do likewise with still more others!

Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Support & Prayers from Tim

The previously received (in 2014) and following email message has been reposted with the permission of the author:

" Delegate Kump,
I have looked forward to the information you put out to the people you represent.
I have looked forward to the correspondence, back and forth, with you.
I have come to know you on simple terms as down-to-earth, straight forward, and sincere towards the area and people you represent.
All of these are very rare qualities for someone in your position, by far.
In today's society, it is almost unheard of for anyone to care at all about much.
For one person to care so much, about so many, is more than commendable.
I only hope the residents for whom you worked so hard for are lucky enough to have another representative of your caliber.
You will be missed!!! Greatly!!!
Please don't quit writing.
The information you share with me and the friends I talk with are of great importance to all of us.
It would be a shame not to have your wisdom and experience anymore.
As retired law enforcement, we have had to deal with so much loss throughout our lives. Constants are few and far between.
Like the North star, you are a constant to me and the few friends still left around.
Always, always be safe in future journeys and please don't ever stop your communications.
Support and Prayers Always,
Tim"

Footnote: Please visit www.facebook.com/LarryDKump for more about good governance issues! Also, please share this post with others, asking them to go and do likewise.

Postcriptum: Contributions to my election campaign should be sent to:

Friends of Larry D. Kump
P. O. Box 1131
Falling Waters, West Virginia 25419-1131

Thursday, September 21, 2017

More unsolicited "hands-on" support

"Larry,

There is only a handful of people, both current and past, who have truly "served" as honorable employees of the people of our State and not simply marched to the tune of the "exploiters".

You sir, know who those people are, and I count you among them.

I hope to soon see you in the ranks of "current" again.

Thanks for your service.

Ray Glover"

Footnote:
Please share this message with others, asking them to also go and do likewise!
Then, visit www.facebook.com/LarryDKump for more about good governance issues.

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Hedgesville Mayor Endorses Kump

Wow!
The leadership and people of Hedgesville are dear to me.
Accordingly, Hedgesville Mayor Mary Keller-Pile's personal paean of September 7th on my behalf (www.facebook.com/mkellerpile) deeply touched my heart:

"Larry D. Kump has decided to run for WV House of delegates 2018. Formerly a two term WV delegate #59.

You can read his biography at www.LarryKump.us. (@ This website)

Contributions can be made:

"Friends of Larry D. Kump
P.O. Box 1131
Falling Waters WV 25419

I wish him luck, for he will do great things for WV! "

Footnote: The photo in this post is of Hedgesvile's historic Mt. Clifton hotel (no longer in existence).

Addendum: Please share this message, inviting your friends and associates to visit my facebook posts (www.facebook.com/LarryDKump, asking them to also go and do likewise with even more others!

Monday, September 11, 2017

Previous Forum Feedback from a Friend

Larry,

I am so proud of you; I could just bust a button.

I was telling some of my co-workers how you are just a breath of fresh air!

You are definitely not the typical politician. Please consider this is an extremely high compliment!

But also know that I appreciate those who sacrifice and serve, because I know it is not an easy job.

First, your intro of the 3 B's was perfect--Be Sincere, Be Short, Be Seated--that got everyone's attention.

But then, when you said "Thank God for Mississippi!" (referring to the only State who's worse off than West Virginia), I nearly fell off my chair!

You spoke the truth!

Why don't some of these career politicians get it?

Why aren't they listening?

We do have many problems to resolve.

We need more sensible and honest people like you in office!

Your life-long friend!

Dorothy

Postscriptum: Visit www.facebook.com/LarryDKump for more about good governance issues for West Virginia, and share this post with others, asking them to also go and do likewise!

Thursday, April 13, 2017

A Trifecta & a "Breath of Fresh Air" for WV!

A Trifecta of three big accomplishments and a "Breath of Fresh Air" stand out to me from the recently completed 2017 West Virginia 2017 Legislative Session.

Our State Budget, Broadband Internet Expansion, and Medical Marijuana were the three "Trifecta" issues.

 The Legislature surprised many by holding resolutely firm and refusing to raise taxes on already suffering Mountaineers. However, opportunities to truly uplift our economy and our lives, through meaningful reform of our tax structure, foundered and failed. Also, Governor Justice vetoed the Legislature's proposed budget. Even so, the West Virginia tax reform movement has gained credibility and momentum. Look for more to come in future legislative sessions. Moreover, the Legislature did give approval, to conduct a statewide voter referendum to authorize the sale of 1.6 billion dollars of highway construction bonds, to be used to repair and upgrade our crumbling road system.

 Delegate Roger Hanshaw (R-Clay County) tenaciously won approval of HB 3093, to allow and encourage  broadband internet expansion in West Virginia. It removes broadband internet expansion obstacles, but, best of all, this important legislative accomplishment was finely crafted by his legal team, without any expense to taxpayers. Wow!

 When the approval of the compassionate use of marijuana for medical treatment hit a roadblock in the West Virginia House of Delegates, Delegate Mike Folk (R-Berkeley County) bravely stood up on behalf of voters and forced a vote in favor of further legislative consideration. Realizing the public outcry and need for this medical treatment, Speaker of the House of Delegates Tim Armstead (R-Kanawha County) and Judiciary Committee Chairperson John Shott (R-Mercer County), assisted by a superb legal staff, went to work and crafted further amendments. The result was to allow doctors, under strict supervision, to prescribe medical marijuana. These restrictions would not allow medical marijuana medication to be smoked or otherwise used for recreation. The final legislation builds upon medical standards and procedures already successfully used by other States.

 Finally, my nomination for the "Breath of Fresh Air" West Virginia award was introduced by Delegate Ron Walters (R-Kanawha County). His HB 3008 would be a bold step in reforming our top heavy and cumbersome school system. It would reduce government spending and bureaucratic waste, while also protecting and preserving local citizen and parent oversight of our schools. Delegate Walters' proposal did not get a legislative committee hearing, but it deserves further review and consideration in future legislative sessions. (See more details in the 15 March 2017 "A Breath of Fresh Air" post at this website.)

Yours for better governance,

Larry D. Kump,

Former West Virginia Legislator (2010-2014)

Berkeley County, West Virginia

Please share this information with others, and ask them to go and do likewise!

Thursday, March 16, 2017

About Bloated & Bumbling Bureaucracy, Tax Reform, and the Price of Gasoline

Attorney and public policy proposer Mike Caryl is, for sure and for certain, right on target with his observation that the elimination of West Virginia government's unnecessary programs and bloated management could and should eliminate our current state budget deficit crisis.

Indeed, citizen legislators such as West Virginia Delegates Mike Folk, S. Marshall Wilson, Pat McGeehan, and Tony Paynter have accepted a similar challenge from the Governor. They have drafted specific "line item" amendments to the Governor's proposed budget, in order to accomplish a balanced budget that doesn't include tax increases.

Mr. Caryl's also correct in pointing out that the structural economic imbalance and inefficiency in West Virginia's current and convoluted tax policies truly impede our present and future prosperity, as well as being a major contributor to our deepening economic despair. These skewed public policies even encourage our steady loss of native population and talent, as our best and our brightest "vote with their feet".

That's why the encouragement by him and numerous legislators, to increase and broaden our sales tax, as a mechanism to eliminate our personal income tax and other burdensome tax inequities, should be given serious but also careful consideration. Even so, perhaps it is Mike's personal comment to me, about "those of us who can easily afford to pay" a proposed return to a sales tax on groceries, that sticks so stubbornly in my craw.

The working poor and fixed income retirees are, in fact, not among " those of us who can easily afford to pay" such a grocery tax.

In point of fact, it is my view that legislators and public policy makers need to have a much deeper personal understanding and appreciation of what a desperate struggle it is for many of the working poor and retirees to put food on their families' tables. That angst and heartache is not suffered by "those of us who can easily afford to pay" a grocery sales tax, nor is it or will it be suffered by those on the government dole for "Food Stamps".

Finally, Senate and House of Delegates Transportation Committee Chairmen, Senator Greg Boso and Delegate Marty Gearheart, mirror my thoughts, in their opposition to the Governor's rapaciously regressive and grievously goofy gasoline tax increase proposal.

Yours for better governance,

Larry D. Kump

www.facebook.com/LarryDKump

Please share this post with others, and ask them to go and do likewise!

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

A "Breath of Fresh Air" letter to WV Delegate Ron Walters...

A "Breath of Fresh Air" letter to WV Delegate Ron Walters!

The Monday, March 27th front page news story in "The Journal" daily newspaper ("Bill would redraw map of school districts", www.journal-news.net), by Danyel Vanreenen, underscored my previous March 16th "Breath of Fresh Air" letter (below) to West Virginia Delegate Ron Walters (R - Kanawha County). This is an important West Virginia education reform proposal, which should lay the basis for further serious study and eventual improvement of not only our top-heavy Mountaineer educational system but also our struggling economy.

Ron,

Your recently introduced legislative proposal (HB 3008) truly is empowering for all of us Mountaineers and our children.

It would consolidate and streamline burdensome education bureaucracies, while maintaining our local oversight of our school systems.

It's also a bold step in reducing government spending and bureaucratic waste.

Finally, it could and should be an important piece to solving the puzzle of how to improve the prosperity of all West Virginians, so much so that it inspired my following ditty of praise of you and your proposal:

Hubba Hubba!

Zing Zing!

This will fix our schools,

and make us sing!

Indeed, your proposal is a breath of fresh air for our schools and all of us.

Go get 'em!

Yours for better governance,

Larry D. Kump

Footnote: Some folks have confused and conflated this legislation with the "Common Core" issue. While I also am opposed to Common Core mandates, Delegate Ron Walters' proposal (bill) is not about Common Core. It is about structurally streamlining and improving our West Virginia educational system.

Visit www.facebook.com/LarryDKump!

Saturday, February 18, 2017

It happened one morning

 Previously, I saw a little frog, as I was walking into the  West Virginia State House.

 The frog greeted me, and asked me to pick it up.

 I did, whereupon the frog told me that, if I kissed it, it would turn into a beautiful woman.

 I immediately put the frog and my pocket, and continued on my way.

 The frog then cried out from my pocket, asking me why I didn't kiss it.

 I told it that I'd rather have a talking frog. 

Davy Crockett & the Sockdolager

When I just was a young sprat, the Walt Disney television show about the life of Davy Crockett, the hero of the Alamo, was the favorite of me and my pals. We all even persistently pestered our parents until they allowed all of us to get and proudly wear coonskin hats. Much later in my life, I gleefully discovered that Davy's grandparents once lived only a scant few miles from my Falling Waters home in Spring Mills (Berkeley County, West Virginia), where it still stands today. Back in 2013, I shared the following "Sockdolager" incident from Davy's life with all my fellow West Virginia State Legislators. It speaks for itself.
 - Former West Virgina Delegate Larry D. Kump (2010-2014)



Davy Crockett & the "Sockdolager"

From The Life of Colonel David Crockett,
by Edward S. Ellis (Philadelphia: Porter & Coates, 1884)

Crockett was then the lion of Washington. I was a great admirer of his character, and, having several friends who were intimate with him, I found no difficulty in making his acquaintance. I was fascinated with him, and he seemed to take a fancy to me.

I was one day in the lobby of the House of Representatives when a bill was taken up appropriating money for the benefit of a widow of a distinguished naval officer. Several beautiful speeches had been made in its support – rather, as I thought, because it afforded the speakers a fine opportunity for display than from the necessity of convincing anybody, for it seemed to me that everybody favored it. The Speaker was just about to put the question when Crockett arose. Everybody expected, of course, that he was going to make one of his characteristic speeches in support of the bill. He commenced:

"Mr. Speaker – I have as much respect for the memory of the deceased, and as much sympathy for the sufferings of the living, if suffering there be, as any man in this House, but we must not permit our respect for the dead or our sympathy for a part of the living to lead us into an act of injustice to the balance of the living. I will not go into an argument to prove that Congress has no power to appropriate this money as an act of charity. Every member upon this floor knows it. We have the right, as individuals, to give away as much of our own money as we please in charity; but as members of Congress we have no right so to appropriate a dollar of the public money. Some eloquent appeals have been made to us upon the ground that it is a debt due the deceased. Mr. Speaker, the deceased lived long after the close of the war; he was in office to the day of his death, and I have never heard that the government was in arrears to him. This government can owe no debts but for services rendered, and at a stipulated price. If it is a debt, how much is it? Has it been audited, and the amount due ascertained? If it is a debt, this is not the place to present it for payment, or to have its merits examined. If it is a debt, we owe more than we can ever hope to pay, for we owe the widow of every soldier who fought in the War of 1812 precisely the same amount. There is a woman in my neighborhood, the widow of as gallant a man as ever shouldered a musket. He fell in battle. She is as good in every respect as this lady, and is as poor. She is earning her daily bread by her daily labor; but if I were to introduce a bill to appropriate five or ten thousand dollars for her benefit, I should be laughed at, and my bill would not get five votes in this House. There are thousands of widows in the country just such as the one I have spoken of, but we never hear of any of these large debts to them. Sir, this is no debt. The government did not owe it to the deceased when he was alive; it could not contract it after he died. I do not wish to be rude, but I must be plain. Every man in this House knows it is not a debt. We cannot, without the grossest corruption, appropriate this money as the payment of a debt. We have not the semblance of authority to appropriate it as a charity. Mr. Speaker, I have said we have the right to give as much of our own money as we please. I am the poorest man on this floor. I cannot vote for this bill, but I will give one week's pay to the object, and if every member of Congress will do the same, it will amount to more than the bill asks."

He took his seat. Nobody replied. The bill was put upon its passage, and, instead of passing unanimously, as was generally supposed, and as, no doubt, it would, but for that speech, it received but few votes, and, of course, was lost.

Like many other young men, and old ones, too, for that matter, who had not thought upon the subject, I desired the passage of the bill, and felt outraged at its defeat. I determined that I would persuade my friend Crockett to move a reconsideration the next day.

Previous engagements preventing me from seeing Crockett that night, I went early to his room the next morning and found him engaged in addressing and franking letters, a large pile of which lay upon his table.

I broke in upon him rather abruptly, by asking him what devil had possessed him to make that speech and defeat that bill yesterday. Without turning his head or looking up from his work, he replied:

"You see that I am very busy now; take a seat and cool yourself. I will be through in a few minutes, and then I will tell you all about it."

He continued his employment for about ten minutes, and when he had finished he turned to me and said:

"Now, sir, I will answer your question. But thereby hangs a tale, and one of considerable length, to which you will have to listen."

I listened, and this is the tale which I heard:

Several years ago I was one evening standing on the steps of the Capitol with some other members of Congress, when our attention was attracted by a great light over in Georgetown. It was evidently a large fire. We jumped into a hack and drove over as fast as we could. When we got there, I went to work, and I never worked as hard in my life as I did there for several hours. But, in spite of all that could be done, many houses were burned and many families made homeless, and, besides, some of them had lost all but the clothes they had on. The weather was very cold, and when I saw so many women and children suffering, I felt that something ought to be done for them, and everybody else seemed to feel the same way.

The next morning a bill was introduced appropriating $20,000 for their relief. We put aside all other business and rushed it through as soon as it could be done. I said everybody felt as I did. That was not quite so; for, though they perhaps sympathized as deeply with the sufferers as I did, there were a few of the members who did not think we had the right to indulge our sympathy or excite our charity at the expense of anybody but ourselves. They opposed the bill, and upon its passage demanded the yeas and nays. There were not enough of them to sustain the call, but many of us wanted our names to appear in favor of what we considered a praiseworthy measure, and we voted with them to sustain it. So the yeas and nays were recorded, and my name appeared on the journals in favor of the bill.

The next summer, when it began to be time to think about the election, I concluded I would take a scout around among the boys of my district. I had no opposition there, but, as the election was some time off, I did not know what might turn up, and I thought it was best to let the boys know that I had not forgot them, and that going to Congress had not made me too proud to go to see them.

So I put a couple of shirts and a few twists of tobacco into my saddlebags, and put out. I had been out about a week and had found things going very smoothly, when, riding one day in a part of my district in which I was more of a stranger than any other, I saw a man in a field plowing and coming toward the road. I gauged my gait so that we should meet as he came to the fence. As he came up I spoke to the man. He replied politely, but, as I thought, rather coldly, and was about turning his horse for another furrow when I said to him: "Don't be in such a hurry, my friend; I want to have a little talk with you, and get better acquainted."

He replied: "I am very busy, and have but little time to talk, but if it does not take too long, I will listen to what you have to say."

I began: "Well, friend, I am one of those unfortunate beings called candidates, and – "

"'Yes, I know you; you are Colonel Crockett. I have seen you once before, and voted for you the last time you were elected. I suppose you are out electioneering now, but you had better not waste your time or mine. I shall not vote for you again.'

This was a sockdolager... I begged him to tell me what was the matter.

"Well, Colonel, it is hardly worthwhile to waste time or words upon it. I do not see how it can be mended, but you gave a vote last winter which shows that either you have not capacity to understand the Constitution, or that you are wanting in honesty and firmness to be guided by it. In either case you are not the man to represent me. But I beg your pardon for expressing it in that way. I did not intend to avail myself of the privilege of the Constitution to speak plainly to a candidate for the purpose of insulting or wounding you. I intend by it only to say that your understanding of the Constitution is very different from mine; and I will say to you what, but for my rudeness, I should not have said, that I believe you to be honest. But an understanding of the Constitution different from mine I cannot overlook, because the Constitution, to be worth anything, must be held sacred, and rigidly observed in all its provisions. The man who wields power and misinterprets it is the more dangerous the more honest he is."

"I admit the truth of all you say, but there must be some mistake about it, for I do not remember that I gave any vote last winter upon any constitutional question."

"No, Colonel, there's no mistake. Though I live here in the backwoods and seldom go from home, I take the papers from Washington and read very carefully all the proceedings of Congress. My papers say that last winter you voted for a bill to appropriate $20,000 to some sufferers by a fire in Georgetown. Is that true?"

"Certainly it is, and I thought that was the last vote which anybody in the world would have found fault with."

"Well, Colonel, where do you find in the Constitution any authority to give away the public money in charity?"

Here was another sockdolager; for, when I began to think about it, I could not remember a thing in the Constitution that authorized it. I found I must take another tack, so I said:

"Well, my friend; I may as well own up. You have got me there. But certainly nobody will complain that a great and rich country like ours should give the insignificant sum of $20,000 to relieve its suffering women and children, particularly with a full and overflowing Treasury, and I am sure, if you had been there, you would have done just as I did."

"It is not the amount, Colonel, that I complain of; it is the principle. In the first place, the government ought to have in the Treasury no more than enough for its legitimate purposes. But that has nothing to do with the question. The power of collecting and disbursing money at pleasure is the most dangerous power that can be entrusted to man, particularly under our system of collecting revenue by a tariff, which reaches every man in the country, no matter how poor he may be, and the poorer he is the more he pays in proportion to his means. What is worse, it presses upon him without his knowledge where the weight centers, for there is not a man in the United States who can ever guess how much he pays to the government. So you see, that while you are contributing to relieve one, you are drawing it from thousands who are even worse off than he. If you had the right to give anything, the amount was simply a matter of discretion with you, and you had as much right to give $20,000,000 as $20,000. If you have the right to give to one, you have the right to give to all; and, as the Constitution neither defines charity nor stipulates the amount, you are at liberty to give to any and everything which you may believe, or profess to believe, is a charity, and to any amount you may think proper. You will very easily perceive what a wide door this would open for fraud and corruption and favoritism, on the one hand, and for robbing the people on the other. No, Colonel, Congress has no right to give charity. Individual members may give as much of their own money as they please, but they have no right to touch a dollar of the public money for that purpose. If twice as many houses had been burned in this county as in Georgetown, neither you nor any other member of Congress would have thought of appropriating a dollar for our relief. There are about two hundred and forty members of Congress. If they had shown their sympathy for the sufferers by contributing each one week's pay, it would have made over $13,000. There are plenty of wealthy men in and around Washington who could have given $20,000 without depriving themselves of even a luxury of life. The Congressmen chose to keep their own money, which, if reports be true, some of them spend not very creditably; and the people about Washington, no doubt, applauded you for relieving them from the necessity of giving by giving what was not yours to give. The people have delegated to Congress, by the Constitution, the power to do certain things. To do these, it is authorized to collect and pay moneys, and for nothing else. Everything beyond this is usurpation, and a violation of the Constitution."

I have given you an imperfect account of what he said. Long before he was through, I was convinced that I had done wrong. He wound up by saying:

"So you see, Colonel, you have violated the Constitution in what I consider a vital point. It is a precedent fraught with danger to the country, for when Congress once begins to stretch its power beyond the limits of the Constitution, there is no limit to it, and no security for the people. I have no doubt you acted honestly, but that does not make it any better, except as far as you are personally concerned, and you see that I cannot vote for you."

I tell you I felt streaked. I saw if I should have opposition, and this man should go talking, he would set others to talking, and in that district I was a gone fawn-skin. I could not answer him, and the fact is, I did not want to. But I must satisfy him, and I said to him:

"Well, my friend, you hit the nail upon the head when you said I had not sense enough to understand the Constitution. I intended to be guided by it, and thought I had studied it full. I have heard many speeches in Congress about the powers of Congress, but what you have said there at your plow has got more hard, sound sense in it than all the fine speeches I ever heard. If I had ever taken the view of it that you have, I would have put my head into the fire before I would have given that vote; and if you will forgive me and vote for me again, if I ever vote for another unconstitutional law I wish I may be shot."

He laughingly replied:

"Yes, Colonel, you have sworn to that once before, but I will trust you again upon one condition. You say that you are convinced that your vote was wrong. Your acknowledgment of it will do more good than beating you for it. If, as you go around the district, you will tell people about this vote, and that you are satisfied it was wrong, I will not only vote for you, but will do what I can to keep down opposition, and, perhaps, I may exert some little influence in that way."

"If I don't," said I, "I wish I may be shot; and to convince you that I am in earnest in what I say, I will come back this way in a week or ten days, and if you will get up a gathering of the people, I will make a speech to them. Get up a barbecue, and I will pay for it."

"No, Colonel, we are not rich people in this section, but we have plenty of provisions to contribute for a barbecue, and some to spare for those who have none. The push of crops will be over in a few days, and we can then afford a day for a barbecue. This is Thursday; I will see to getting it up on Saturday week. Come to my house on Friday, and we will go together, and I promise you a very respectable crowd to see and hear you."

"Well, I will be here. But one thing more before I say good-bye. I must know your name."

"My name is Bunce."

"Not Horatio Bunce?"

"Yes."

"Well, Mr. Bunce, I never saw you before, though you say you have seen me; but I know you very well. I am glad I have met you, and very proud that I may hope to have you for my friend. You must let me shake your hand before I go."

We shook hands and parted.

It was one of the luckiest hits of my life that I met him. He mingled but little with the public, but was widely known for his remarkable intelligence and incorruptible integrity, and for a heart brimful and running over with kindness and benevolence, which showed themselves not only in words but in acts. He was the oracle of the whole country around him, and his fame had extended far beyond the circle of his immediate acquaintance. Though I had never met him before, I had heard much of him, and but for this meeting it is very likely I should have had opposition, and had been beaten. One thing is very certain, no man could now stand up in that district under such a vote.

At the appointed time I was at his house, having told our conversation to every crowd I had met, and to every man I stayed all night with, and I found that it gave the people an interest and a confidence in me stronger than I had ever seen manifested before.

Though I was considerably fatigued when I reached his house, and, under ordinary circumstances, should have gone early to bed, I kept him up until midnight, talking about the principles and affairs of government, and got more real, true knowledge of them than I had got all my life before.

I have told you Mr. Bunce converted me politically. He came nearer converting me religiously than I had ever been before. He did not make a very good Christian of me, as you know; but he has wrought upon my mind a conviction of the truth of Christianity, and upon my feelings a reverence for its purifying and elevating power such as I had never felt before.

I have known and seen much of him since, for I respect him – no, that is not the word – I reverence and love him more than any living man, and I go to see him two or three times every year; and I will tell you, sir, if everyone who professes to be a Christian lived and acted and enjoyed it as he does, the religion of Christ would take the world by storm.

But to return to my story. The next morning we went to the barbecue, and, to my surprise, found about a thousand men there. I met a good many whom I had not known before, and they and my friend introduced me around until I had got pretty well acquainted – at least, they all knew me.

In due time notice was given that I would speak to them. They gathered around a stand that had been erected. I opened my speech by saying:

"Fellow citizens – I present myself before you today feeling like a new man. My eyes have lately been opened to truths which ignorance or prejudice, or both, had heretofore hidden from my view. I feel that I can today offer you the ability to render you more valuable service than I have ever been able to render before. I am here today more for the purpose of acknowledging my error than to seek your votes. That I should make this acknowledgment is due to myself as well as to you. Whether you will vote for me is a matter for your consideration only."

I went on to tell them about the fire and my vote for the appropriation as I have told it to you, and then told them why I was satisfied it was wrong. I closed by saying:

"And now, fellow citizens, it remains only for me to tell you that the most of the speech you have listened to with so much interest was simply a repetition of the arguments by which your neighbor, Mr. Bunce, convinced me of my error.

"It is the best speech I ever made in my life, but he is entitled to the credit of it. And now I hope he is satisfied with his convert and that he will get up here and tell you so."

He came upon the stand and said:

"Fellow citizens – It affords me great pleasure to comply with the request of Colonel Crockett. I have always considered him a thoroughly honest man, and I am satisfied that he will faithfully perform all that he has promised you today."

He went down, and there went up from the crowd such a shout for Davy Crockett as his name never called forth before.

I am not much given to tears, but I was taken with a choking then and felt some big drops rolling down my cheeks. And I tell you now that the remembrance of those few words spoken by such a man, and the honest, hearty shout they produced, is worth more to me than all the honors I have received and all the reputation I have ever made, or ever shall make, as a member of Congress.

"Now, Sir," concluded Crockett, "you know why I made that speech yesterday. I have had several thousand copies of it printed and was directing them to my constituents when you came in.

"There is one thing now to which I will call your attention. You remember that I proposed to give a week's pay. There are in that House many very wealthy men – men who think nothing of spending a week's pay, or a dozen of them for a dinner or a wine party when they have something to accomplish by it. Some of those same men made beautiful speeches upon the great debt of gratitude which the country owed the deceased – a debt which could not be paid by money, particularly so insignificant a sum as $10,000, when weighed against the honor of the nation. Yet not one of them responded to my proposition. Money with them is nothing but trash when it is to come out of the people. But it is the one great thing for which most of them are striving, and many of them sacrifice honor, integrity, and justice to obtain it."


Thursday, February 16, 2017

Musings about our Elected Leaders

This is a revision of a previous posting of mine, originally made several years ago, as I was sitting in my State Capitol office and serving as a citizen member of the West Virginia State Legislature.

As the 2017 session of the West Virginia Legislature now enters into the intensity of the final weeks of the session and is dealing with the need for many urgent and needed reforms, some legislator behaviors have remained unchanged.

There still is great propensity for our elected legislators to spend much of their time on the floor of the House of Delegates and State Senate, sponsoring irrelevant resolutions and making silly speeches. This includes dedicating bridges, roads, and even turn lanes to constituents back home, and also to making a great show of introducing various guests.

And so it was that these issues continued in my musings as I was reading "Emma and Joseph" (1999, Covenant Communications, Inc.) when the words describing Joseph Smith's visit to the United States Congress seemed to leap off the page (page 215):

"There is a great deal of wind blown off on the occasion of each day...."

Visit my other posts at this website for my thoughts on the more pressing political issues.

Please share this message with others, and ask them to go and do likewise!

Thursday, January 19, 2017

Hoosier Homage

Offering an invocation at the West Virginia State Legislature

The following is my response to an old Hoosier friend, and his original note to me:

Noel,

Thank you for your kind thoughts and encouraging words.

The surgeon tells me that I have a most excellent prognosis, although the final results of the biopsy are still being analyzed.

I think of you, my former Hoosier Bishop, and my other old friends in Indiana often, as I also pine for the company of my friends and former associates in the West Virginia State Capitol.

Meanwhile, why God repeatedly has made me His "Designated Survivor" remains a mystery to me.

Your fervent friend and fan,

Larry

www.Mormon.org/me/4Y8B

-----Original Message-----

From: "Duerden, Noel H"

Sent: Nov 17, 2016 8:51 PM

To: "Larry D. Kump"

Subject: Kudos to you

I just read your treatise on Faith and Politics ("Faith & Politics, My Personal Pilgrimage" entry at this website) and marvel at your understanding and depth of thought. It was an inspiration to me and further affirms my faith in the Latter-day work. I would so much like to have you in Indiana again where you could help our members and others, understand and live lives more fully. I hope your cancer is beaten so that you can continue helping others in their quests for truth and understanding of life